Kunstmagazin

Futuristic elements and fragmented figures – Elisa Carutti on painting in an interview with Ruth Polleit Riechert

Futuristic elements and fragmented figures – Elisa Carutti on painting in an interview with Ruth Polleit Riechert

Elisa Carutti was born in Milan in 1991. She owns a BA Degree in Painting from the Academy of Fine Arts of Brera, Milan (2014), and a MFA from Slade School of Fine Arts, UCL, London (2018). Her work has been exhibited in UK, Italy, France and Greece. She received several awards (e.g. ERASMUS Bursary at Ecole Nationale Superieure de Beaux Arts in Paris in 2013) and took part in residencies abroad. Her works were published internationally in the Spring Issue 2018 of the Art Maze Mag, London.

When did you start working as an artist and why?

I was born in a family where there is lot of sensitivity for the arts in general; many of my family members worked and still do in the creative world from the architecture to the product design and fashion. My aunt used to work for the main theatre of Milan called Piccolo Teatro and she would encourage me a lot to pursue an artistic career. Her mother studied at the Academy of Brera back in the 40’s but she never fully realised to be a professional artist as she dedicated her life to be wife and mother. Although, she taught me how to draw still lives from natural compositions and those time spent whilst drawing in silence are still fresh in my mind like her beautiful drawings of chestnuts. I loved drawing and copying from nature most of all, I found it very relaxing and it happened I wasn’t so bad at it, so it was natural for me to follow what I liked to do.

Installation View, Aurora Borealis #10, 2019, 180 x 210 cm

Installation View, Aurora Borealis #10, 2019, 180 x 210 cm

Installation View, Aurora Borealis #02, 2018, 90 x 75 cm (left) – Aurora Borealis #09, 2019, 130 x 160 cm (right)

Installation View, Aurora Borealis #02, 2018, 90 x 75 cm (left) – Aurora Borealis #09, 2019, 130 x 160 cm (right)

What impact did your first art school have? What did you make leave your home country Italy and come to London? In what way did Slade influence your work or not?

My first art school was the Fine Arts Academy of Brera in my hometown Milan. I still think of my years during the BA as a very tough time for my career; I didn’t know what I liked anymore, I was very insecure of showing my work to people and at that time in Milan there was still a bit of conceptualism in the way we approached art. I felt I wasn’t part of that but at the same time I didn’t know where else I could belong. That’s why after I did the Erasmus in Paris I decided to spend more time abroad to see what was going on outside my city. So after graduating from my BA at Brera I applied for a Master in London at the Slade and here I am. The Slade offered me the time to focus on what I wanted to do most of anything else: painting. And I could do this while being surrounded by great friends and artists, exchanging opinions with them and growing artistically together. It was everyday very stimulating living that context and would encourage everybody to think very seriously about our art practice.

Who and what is inspiring you (apart from art schools - Milan, Paris, London - and teachers)?

Well, for some reason I am very attracted by things that we can’t prove whether they really exist or not like the faith in God or for example the celestial phenomenon. Maybe, because like art for me, they function as an escape from the everyday reality and they give me a message of hope.

I am attracted a lot by astronomical images that I see on the newspaper and I always have them in mind when I am working on my paintings. Quiet recently I placed the human figure in the sky without representing it entirely. It’s always a fragment of a face, a single arm or a hand, as I want to paint like things happen in a dream without a logic link, pieces of different scenarios happening all at the same time without a chronological order. In this way I can say that I am influenced by the digital: the impossibility of focusing the attention on just one image because one second later I am attracted by a new one that I want to paint.

Which materials do you work with and which techniques do you prefer?

Right now I am working just with painting and oil colors but in the past I experienced with many different mediums. I love the simplicity of painting, you don’t need too much to make a painting, just canvas, colors and brushes but you can make such great things out of these simple ingredients. Also, I like to play with the tradition and history of this medium, I believe that art’s history is a question of references among the authors that crossing the times, can bring together a middle age work with a contemporary one, for instance. And it’s very interesting to look at art in this way because it means that the human, although it changed the form, it didn’t change the substance of what needs and ultimately can help to understand better the present time and maybe wonder about the future. I am attracted by works that have a character of universality in what they want to say, nevertheless trends because they are able to always say something new to the viewer. That’s why is the time the hardest judge for an artist!

Installation View, Aurora Borealis #08, 2018, 105 x 90 cm (left) – Aurora Borealis #07, 2018, 130 x 160 cm (right)

Installation View, Aurora Borealis #08, 2018, 105 x 90 cm (left) – Aurora Borealis #07, 2018, 130 x 160 cm (right)

Elisa Carutti, Installation View

Elisa Carutti, Installation View

What do you want to say with your art?

As I mentioned earlier, it’s just recently that I introduced the human figure in my work and I am very interested in how I can carry on with this series of painting. Most of all, I would like to push further the futuristic element; I imagine my paintings to be images from the future, what’s left after an apocalypse has taken place. There is a destruction element due to the fragmentation of the human figure that I would like to explore deeper in my research. It’s also evident in the way I work too; fragmented figures are the result of a destructive act during the making of a painting. The biggest achievement for me would be to touch the viewer feelings whilst looking at my painting. Recently, I have seen a show of Antonello da Messina’s paintings and I felt so much mystery in his portraits apart being so beautiful.. For an hour I was immersed in a completely different world, I wouldn’t mind to stimulate that in a viewer of my paintings!


Deutsch

Futuristische Elemente und fragmentierte Figuren – Elisa Carutti im Interview mit Ruth Polleit Riechert

Elisa Carutti wurde 1991 in Mailand geboren. Sie hat mit einem BA in Malerei an der Akademie der Schönen Künste von Brera, Mailand, im Jahr 2014 und mit einem MFA die Slade School of Fine Arts, UCL, London im 2018 abgeschlossen. Ihre Arbeiten wurden in Großbritannien, Italien, Frankreich und Griechenland ausgestellt. Sie erhielt mehrere Auszeichnungen (z. B. das ERASMUS-Stipendium an der Ecole Nationale Superieure de Beaux Arts in Paris im Jahr 2013) und nahm an weiteren Auslandsaufenthalten teil. Ihre Arbeiten wurden international unter anderem in der Frühjahrsausgabe 2018 des Art Maze Mag, London, veröffentlicht.

Wann hast du als Künstler angefangen und warum?

Ich wurde in einer Familie geboren, in der die Künste im Allgemeinen sehr breit vertreten sind sind. Viele meiner Familienmitglieder sind in kreativen Bereichen beschäftigt: von der Architektur über das Produktdesign bis zur Mode. Meine Tante arbeitete für das Mailänder Haupttheater Piccolo Teatro und ermutigte mich sehr, eine künstlerische Laufbahn einzuschlagen. Ihre Mutter hat in den 40er Jahren an der Academy of Brera studiert, aber sie hat sich nie als professionelle Künstlerin gesehen, da sie ihr Leben als Ehefrau und Mutter gelebt hat. Sie hat mir beigebracht, wie man Stillleben aus natürlichen Kompositionen zeichnet, und die Zeit, die ich mit ihr beim Zeichnen in der Stille verbracht habe, ist in meinem Kopf immer noch ganz lebendig - so wie ihre wunderschönen Zeichnungen von Kastanien. Am liebsten habe ich in der Natur aus gezeichnet und gemalt, ich fand es sehr entspannend und da ich talentiert war, hat es für mich ergeben, dem zu folgen, was ich gerne tat.

Welchen Einfluss hatte deine erste Akademie? Was hat dazu geführt, dein Heimatland Italien zu verlassen und nach London zu kommen? Inwiefern hat die Slade School deine Arbeit beeinflusst oder nicht?

Meine erste Kunstschule war die Kunstakademie von Brera in meiner Heimatstadt Mailand. Ich denke immer noch, dass meine Jahre währenddessen eine sehr harte Zeit für meine Karriere waren; Ich wusste nicht mehr, was ich mochte, ich war sehr unsicher, meine Arbeit den Menschen zu zeigen, und zu dieser Zeit näherte man sich in Mailand der Kunst immer noch über Konzeptkunst. Ich hatte das Gefühl, nicht Teil davon zu sein, wusste aber gleichzeitig nicht, wo ich sonst hingehören könnte. Deshalb habe ich nach dem Erasmus Programm in Paris beschlossen, mehr Zeit im Ausland zu verbringen, um zu sehen, was außerhalb meiner Stadt vor sich geht. Nach meinem BA-Abschluss in Brera habe ich mich für einen Master in London an der Slade School beworben und hier bin ich. Die Slade bot mir die Zeit, mich auf das zu konzentrieren, was ich am liebsten tun wollte: Malen. Und das konnte ich tun, indem ich von großartigen Freunden und Künstlern umgeben war, mit ihnen Meinungen austauschte und uns gemeinsam künstlerisch entwickeltet. Es war jeden Tag sehr anregend, in diesem Kontext zu leben und hat jeden von uns ermutigt, sehr ernsthaft über unsere künstlerische Praxis nachzudenken.

Wer und was inspiriert dich (außer Kunstschulen - Mailand, Paris, London - und Lehrern)?

Aus irgendeinem Grund finde ich Dinge, die wir nicht beweisen können, ob sie wirklich existieren oder nicht, wie der Glaube an Gott oder zum Beispiel das Phänomen des Himmels, sehr reizvoll. Vielleicht, weil sie für mich wie Kunst die Flucht aus dem Alltag sind und mir Hoffnung geben.

Ich bin sehr angetan von astronomischen Bildern, die ich in der Zeitung sehe, und ich denke immer daran, wenn ich an meinen Gemälden arbeite. Vor kurzem habe ich die menschliche Figur vor den Himmel abgebildet, ohne sie vollständig darzustellen. Es ist immer ein Fragment eines Gesichtes, eines einzelnen Armes oder einer Hand, da ich malen möchte, wie es in einem Traum ohne logische Verknüpfung geschieht, Teile verschiedener Szenarien, die ohne chronologische Reihenfolge alle gleichzeitig passieren. Auf diese Weise kann ich sagen, dass ich vom Digitalen beeinflusst bin: der Unmöglichkeit, die Aufmerksamkeit auf nur ein Bild zu lenken, weil ich eine Sekunde später von einem neuen Bild inspiriert werde, das ich malen möchte.

Mit welchen Materialien arbeitest du und welche Techniken bevorzugst du?

Im Moment arbeite ich nur mit Malerei und Ölfarben, aber in der Vergangenheit habe ich viele verschiedene Medien erlebt. Ich mag die Einfachheit des Malens, man braucht nicht zu viel, um ein Bild zu machen, nur Leinwand, Farben und Pinsel, aber man kann so großartige Dinge aus diesen einfachen Zutaten machen. Ich spiele auch gerne mit der Tradition und Geschichte dieses Mediums. Ich glaube, dass Kunstgeschichte eine Frage von Referenzen unter den Autoren ist, die die Zeiten überschreiten und zum Beispiel ein mittelalterliches Werk mit einem zeitgenössischen Werk verbinden können. Und es ist sehr interessant, Kunst auf diese Weise zu betrachten, denn es bedeutet, dass der Mensch, obwohl er die Form veränderte, nicht die Substanz dessen veränderte, was er brauchte, und letztendlich dazu beitragen kann, die Gegenwart besser zu verstehen und sich vielleicht über die Zukunft zu wundern . Ich bin von Werken angezogen, die einen universellen Charakter in dem haben, was sie sagen wollen, und trotzdem Trends, weil sie dem Betrachter immer etwas Neues sagen können. Deshalb ist die Zeit für einen Künstler die schwierigste!

Was möchtest du mit deiner Kunst sagen?

Wie bereits erwähnt, habe ich erst kürzlich die menschliche Figur in meine Arbeit eingeführt und bin sehr daran interessiert, wie ich mit dieser Serie von Gemälden weitermachen kann. Vor allem möchte ich das futuristische Element weiter vorantreiben: Ich stelle mir meine Bilder als Bilder der Zukunft vor, als etwas, das nach einer Apokalypse übrig geblieben ist. Es gibt ein Zerstörungselement aufgrund der Fragmentierung der menschlichen Figur, das ich in meinen Forschungen vertiefen möchte. Das zeigt sich auch in meiner Arbeitsweise. fragmentierte Figuren sind das Ergebnis eines destruktiven Aktes während der Malerei. Die größte Leistung für mich wäre es, die Gefühle des Betrachters beim Betrachten meines Gemäldes zu berühren. Kürzlich habe ich eine Ausstellung von Gemälden von Antonello da Messina gesehen, und ich fühlte so viel Mysterisches, abgesehen davon, dass seine Porträts so wunderschön waren. Eine Stunde lang war ich in eine völlig andere Welt eingetaucht, und es würde mich freuen, dies beim Betrachten meiner meiner Bilder zu erreichen!


Selected artworks by Elisa Carutti are available at www.rpr-art.com. If you are interested please contact Ruth Polleit Riechert from RPR ART.

Interview: Ruth Polleit Riechert
Photos: Katarzyna Perlak (Header) – Installation Views by Exposed Arts Projects


Amparo Sard and Ruth Polleit Riechert in a Conversation – Studio Visit on Mallorca

Amparo Sard and Ruth Polleit Riechert in a Conversation – Studio Visit on Mallorca

Florence Lazar – Was wärst du ohne mich

Florence Lazar – Was wärst du ohne mich